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Tuesday, 15 March 2016

Walk out to Gleann Dubh Lighe

On Wednesday March 9 2016 I took a walk along Gleann Dubh Lighe, which is just under two miles east of Glenfinnan. 
Gleann Dubh Lighe provides a pleasant walk along the west side of the river surrounded by a mixture of coniferous and deciduous trees for the first  two miles.
The track then crosses the river via an old wooden bridge to the east side where, about 400 yards further on, is a very well maintained bothy.
Carrying on past the bothy, the track becomes fairly rough and muddy with coniferous trees on the east side and birch trees on the west side. 


photo of Gleann Duhb Lighe after the deer fence

Gleann Dubh Lighe after the deer fence


After about a mile, the trees finish and a deer fence and gate straddle the track. Going through the gate the terrain changes and you are in a wide open valley surrounded, at this time of year, with snow -capped mountains.


 Image of  Gleann Duhb Lighe with Streap at its head

North end of Gleann Dubh Lighe with Streap at its head


My aim was to reach the saddle situated half way up the south slope of Streap, just at the snow line centre in the image above. Only approx. one and half miles away from the point where the deer fence straddles the path and a climb of about 1,500feet from the start.

Photo of The track meandered through boggy ground littered with mossy bright green humps

The track meandered through boggy ground littered with mossy bright green humps


The track was quite boggy at this point, and it was here that I spotted my first frog spawn of the year - not really sure what happens to it if the weather turns and it freezes.

Photo of Old tree stumps and various coloured grasses add interest to the bog.

Old tree stumps and various coloured grasses add interest to the bog


The track eventually crossed the river again, this time across a well maintained metal bridge. On the map, the track ended here but there was an old vehicle track, which followed the north bank of the river.
Unfortunately that wasn't the direction I was going so I had to make do with finding my own route across the tufted grass and bogs.
On the north side of the river, close to the metal bridge, are the remains of an old stone structure, possibly an old croft house - must have been a hard life if that's what it was.

photo of The remains of a stone structure can be seen just across the river

The remains of a stone structure can be seen just across the river

The weather that day was particularly good after the weather we have been having. It was warm
and dry with just a few white clouds - great for photography.
The only problem I had was, after the extremely wet weather we have been having over the last few months (for months read years!!), the ground was very wet under foot.


Photo of Looking over the rocky river towards snow covered peak of Streap

Looking over the rocky river towards snow-covered peak of Streap

The good conditions gave me a chance to experiment with a couple of panoramic images. The image below was five images taken handheld from left to right and stitched together in Adobe Lightroom. Can't really fault the result.


Pano image from the left - Stob Coire Nan Cearc, centre - Streap, Right - Streap Comhlaidh

Pano image (from left) - Stob Coire Nan Cearc, Streap and Streap Comhlaidh


The climb up the grassy slope of Streap was fairly hard going. It was very steep with many tufts of grass, but eventually I got to the small grassy plateau behind the saddle just at the snow line.

Photo Looking south along Gleann Dubh Lighe over my route from just below the snow line

Looking south along Gleann Dubh Lighe back over my route from just below the snow line


Below another image looking south along Gleann Dubh Lighe from just at the snow line, which on this day was 1,450 ft.
Overall a fantastic day in a beautiful quiet Scottish Glen.

Photo looking south along Gleann Duhb Lighe from just at the snow line

Looking south along Gleann Dubh Lighe from the snow line


Below are some photos I took a few days earlier, when I took the track along the north side of the river.

photolooking south long Gleann Duhb Lighe towards Beinn an Tuim

Looking south towards Beinn an Tuim



Looking south towards Beinn an Tuim

Looking south towards Beinn an Tuim



Looking south towards Beinn an Tuim converted to mono in Adobe Lightroom.

Looking south towards Beinn an Tuim converted to mono in Adobe Lightroom.





Thursday, 12 March 2015

Grounding of Cargo Vessel Fri Sea at Corpach, Fort William

  Grounding of Cargo Vessel Fri Sea at Corpach, Fort William

The Fri Sea, a cargo vessel got stranded during docking manoeuvres at Corpach, close to Fort William. I didn't have to go far for these images as this all happened just a couple of hundred yards from my home.

The vessel got blown onto the beach at Corpach during gale force winds.
Another vessel which was already moored at the Corpach port attempted to tow the stricken vessel of the sand band on Sunday mornings high tide but was unsuccessful.

A tug contracted by the ship’s owners arrived at the scene that night and set up a tow line, before pulling the vessel free at high water at 8pm.
Luckily no damage was done and there were no injuries.



An attempt was made by the  Burhou I to tow the Fri Sea off the beach on the Sunday morning's high tide but was unsuccessful



Image of The  Burhou I returning to her berth after the failed attempt to tow the Fri Sea off the Corpach beach

The  Burhou I returning to her berth after the failed attempt to tow the Fri Sea off the Corpach beach


The Fri Sea became an attraction for local people as the tide went out and locals were able to walk out to the vessel.


The people on the sand around the vessel gives some impression of scale

               

The sand and mud helps to minimize damage to the Fri Sea



Corpach port used to load timber onto the cargo vessels


 

The Fri Sea beached with the entrance to the Caledonian Canal in the background


The Fri Sea still grounded at High Tide


My wife Sue next to the hull to give an idea of the size of this ship.


The front thruster used while attempting to re-float the ship moved a large amount of sand.

A three image panorama used to get the whole of the ship into the frame


Saturday, 23 August 2014

Sgurr an Utha an Attractive Corbett (A scottish Mountain between 2500feet and 3000 feet)

 



Photo of Sgurr an Utha in Lochaber

Rain approaching Sgurr an Utha


Many walkers and climbers spend much of their time hunting out their next Munro (a Scottish mountain over 3,000 feet), however there are many very good mountains between 2,500 feet and 3,000 feet known as Corbetts.

One such mountain is Sgurr an Utha, which can be found a couple of miles west of Glenfinnan. The attraction of Corbetts for me is that they are slightly less crowded than many of the Munros and therefore provide a better photographic opportunity.

On Friday this week, we (my wife Sue and I) took a trip up Sgurr an Utha. The weather was kind to us. We had a rain free day although we could see rain passing close by on all sides.

This was a fine opportunity to try the Olympus OMD EM-5 in a mountain situation.



Photo of a rainbow onSgurr an Utha, lochaber

Rain passes by Sgurr an Utha 


I found that I was able to keep the 12-50 mm lens attached at all times with no need to change lenses. In the past, I have had to carry a heavy tripod but, with the image stabiliser on the OMD EM-5 body,  there was no need as all lenses are automatically stabilised. This made the whole experience more enjoyable and made me feel much less of a pack horse.

Photo of view looking south from Sgurr an Utha

On the way up looking south




Photo of view looking south from Sgurr an Utha

On the way up looking south 2




photo of the moon scape slopes of Sgurr an Utha, Lochaber

The route through the moonscape of the lower slopes of Sgurr an Utha 

The route up this mountain gives all round views of the surrounding landscape with Loch Eil and Ben Nevis in the south east and Loch Beoraid in the west

Loch Eil and Ben Nevis in the background



Photo of Loch Beoraid from Sgurr an Utha

Loch Beoraid in the west


 
photo of Sgurr landscape with person to give some scale

Landscape of Sgurr an Utha with photographer beside lochan to give some scale



 



And the end result is me at the summit

Photo - Sue Restan


Thursday, 21 August 2014

Corran ferry, Lochaber, Scottish Highlands



photo of he Corran Ferry on loch Linnhe in the Scottish Highlands

Corran Ferry


This image was taken from a boat as we were travelling from Inverness to the Isle of Mull. We had passed in front of the ferry and, as I looked back, I saw that it was going to straddle our wake. I grabbed the camera and took this quick shot.

Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Duart Castle on the Isle of Mull



Photo of Duart castle

Duart Castle





On a recent trip to the Isle of Mull, we went to Duart Castle and took a number of photos but these two stood out for me.

The first is just a straight on photo of the castle. The light was a bit hit and miss that day with very bright skies one minute and clouds the next, but it was just right at the time I took this shot.

The next image shows the chimney pots which I noticed while walking round the battlements. They seemed to be crying out for a black and white photo.
 



Duart castle pots

Corpach Boat

Photo of corpach boat in colour

Corpach Boat 1

 

This image was taken a couple of days ago, not sure the history of this boat, or even if it is actually seaworthy.

On this occasion the weather was cloudy with rain showers. Normally the photographic attraction of this boat is that it lies at the northern end of Loch Linnhe near to my home. In good weather Ben Nevis can be seen in the background.

Between showers I managed a couple of shots.

This is one of those images that I like black and white in preference to the colour version



Corpach boat mono


 



Glen Nevis, Lochaber.

Photo of Glen Nevis

Glen Nevis 1

Following a move to Fort William in the Scottish Highlands earlier in the year, I've been too busy with the new house to spend much time out with the camera.

Now we're more settled, it's time to start uploading again.

On Monday this week, Sue and I took a trip up Glen Nevis, which lies in the shadow of Ben Nevis - the highest peak in the UK.

I wanted to see how suitable the Olympus OMD EM-5 was for doing hand-held hdr images. Glen Nevis1 is a single frame with some processing done in Lightroom 5.

Glen Nevis2 (below) is 5 frames merged and processed in Photomatix pro.
Personally I prefer the single frame for this particular subject, but it does show that when needed hdr hand-held is a viable possibility with the OMD EM-5.





Photo of Gen Nevis (hdr)

Glen Nevis 2